Thrice

 

California’s prime post-hardcore quartet bring their new Radiohead-esque sound to South Florida.

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By Michelle Rada

California’s prime post-hardcore quartet, Thrice, will make an appearance in Fort Lauderdale’s Revolution (200 W. Broward Blvd) on July 2, 2010. Adding an unconventional pairing to the night, Thrice will be accompanied by Brooklyn’s own high-pitched indie-pop musician(s), Kevin Devine and the Goddamn Band. Bad Veins (Cincinnati) and The Dig (New York) will also open for Thrice with mellow head-bopping tunes ala Devine.

Recorded in guitarist Teppei Teranishi’s garage studio, Thrice’s August 2009 LP, Beggars, has collected a slew of positive reviews ranging from the headbanger-friendly Alternative Press to the media moguls in BBC (British Broadcasting Corporation).  Through Beggars, Thrice has shifted toward a more refined sound. The album veers away from the post-hardcore feel of 2002’s The Illusion of Safety – and delves into an increasingly complex, Radiohead-esque realm. Although some may miss the original thrashy riffs that have by now faded into the early 2000s, Thrice’s new sound is simply matured- not dulled.

Dustin Kensrue, Thrice’s vocalist, rhythm guitarist, and lyricist chatted with us (mid-tour) before the South Florida headlining show.

How’s the tour been so far?
Its been going great. It’s been really great.

How have your fans received Beggars?
Pretty well, everyone’s been really encouraging and excited with the direction that we chose to go. Though I know that everyone’s got different taste and of course the new album can’t be everyone’s favorite – it’s definitely our favorite.

I read that the album was recorded in a garage studio. How was that in comparison to previous recording experiences?
We recorded this record and The Alchemy Index in the same studio, our guitarist Teppei Teranishi’s garage. I really like recording there and not having a bunch of other people around. It’s just us – and it makes things flow a little quicker. We’ve learned how to work together a lot better without relying on another set of ears. The only drawback is that it’s so small, but we’re looking for ways around that in the future.

How have your influences changed across albums?
We all listen to all sorts of music. It’s almost impossible to nail down what influences one specific record. Since we all listen to pretty diverse pieces of music, all kinds of influences fuse each time we record something.

Tell me about your solo project. How’d that come about?
With a song I had that I wrote the riff for when I was probably 17 or 18. I had it kicking around for a long time. As I played around with friends, they kept encouraging me to make an album – so I finally stepped down and recorded it.

Musically, in what direction is Thrice headed? Are there prospects for an upcoming Thrice album?
I guess we don’t know where we’re headed musically. We’ll be getting into the studio to write fairly soon, maybe after the tour or a little later into the year. But we’ll definitely be writing this year.

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