What’s that on your doughnut? Flies, rodents, roaches, poop shut down these restaurants

Two dozen roaches crawling on the walls, flies on doughnuts, flies in flour and ice, rodents using chairs as toilets, people not able to use toilets … nobody does diversity like Miami-Dade and Broward counties — and that includes the ways restaurants got shut down over the last few weeks.

What follows is taken from state restaurant inspections, presented without passion or prejudice but more than a cup of humor.

Aklan Buffet, 255 E. Flagler St., Miami — Most of Aklan’s problems on May 4 were parented by “Establishment has no running hot water” and “Sewage/wastewater backing up through the three-compartment sink.”

That eliminates proper handwashing and dishwashing.

So, “food-contact surfaces not washed, rinsed and sanitized, before use … equipment/utensils not properly washed, rinse and sanitized. Establishment has no means to wash, rinse and sanitized, sewage back up in three compartment sink.”

Aklan seemed a little unprepared, as it had no cooking equipment and the inspector dropped Stop Sales on all the food made at somebody’s home (although, it must be said, that home probably had hot water).

The inspector noted, “Aklan buffet used to rent a commercial kitchen next door with a valid catering license (CATR2329504) to cook the food for this establishment, but the kitchen has a new owner, who no longer allows Aklan buffet to use the facility/kitchen.”

There’s no record of a follow-up inspection.

▪ B Bar Tapas & Grill, 2995 NE 163rd St., North Miami Beach — An Intermediate violation on April 25 was “Toxic substance/chemical on premise that is not required for the operation of establishment. Raid roach spray.”

Can’t say the spray didn’t work. While the inspector saw eight live roaches, including five crawling on the floor of the kitchen, there were 50 dead ones — “20 dead roaches in two non-working ovens near the cookline, 20 dead-roaches along walls of the kitchen area, 10 dead roaches under the three-compartment sink in the ware washing area.”

They needed to do something about that walk-in cooler, where the inspector found the floor “soiled with lots of food debris” and “shelves soiled with encrusted food debris.” And the dishwasher wasn’t working.

On the April 26 comeback, the inspector ruled B Bar couldn’t reopen. One remaining problem were the roaches in the kitchen, where there were three live ones and six dead ones.

B Bar was allowed to reopen after the April 27 inspection.

▪ Banyan Restaurant, 250 Racquet Club Blvd., Weston — We’ll open with this observation from May 4: “No paper towels in employees restroom.”

Combine that with this olfactory notation, at the end of a list of icky problems: “objectionable odors in male employees bathroom.”

Next, ladies and gentlemen, the flies. “Observed approximately 40 live flying insects in kitchen area, found on bread and open container with flour. Observed four live flying insects on dry storage wall. Observed three live flying insects on and inside ice machine. Observed approximately 15 live flying insects in dishwashing area.”

And the inspector was dropping Stop Sales like rhymes at Rolling Loud. There’s the milk that had been open 16 days and the sauce that had been open 42 days, both of which were supposed to be consumed within seven days of opening. And four cracked eggs. And a dented can of Instant Mousse Mix.

Throw in “slicer blade soiled with old food debris” and you can see why Banyan got closed. It opened again after the May 5 re-inspection.

▪ Beg for More Japanese & Thai & Tapas, 2831 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Fort Lauderdale — Only seven violations on April 27, but four were High Priority boo-boos. These roaches didn’t clump, but seemed to run about as lone wolves. Check out this distribution of live roaches.

One inside a flip top cooler at a cookline, “crawling on top of plastic container on make table.” One under the cookline prep table next to a flip top cooler. One under the cookline Wok . One under the prep table near the cookline Wok station. Three behind the deep fryer. One on a shelving unit next to fryer. One a reach-in freezer in front line area. One by shelving next to the three-compartment sink. One under the prep table/ condiment station in cookline area. Two by the mop sink area. Two in a dry storage room. Six on silver cooler gaskets in the sushi bar. Two under the counter at sushi bar.

Oh, and one dead one by a gasket at the sushi bar.

Business was put on hold until the re-inspection on April 28.

▪ Chicago 312 (inside Grand Palms Hotel, Spa and Golf Resort), 110 Grand Palms Dr., Pembroke Pines — Which do you want first from May 7, the moldy food or the rodents in the oven?

We’ll go with the moldy foods, Swiss cheese cubes and gravy in the walk-in cooler. That got Stop Sale order. So did these foods for “temperature abuse,” which makes them vulnerable to all kinds of nasty bacteria: sauce, gumbo, cooked diced potatoes, sausage, pooled eggs, cooked chicken, cooked beef franks, cooked burger meat, mac and cheese, meat sauce, beef roast, cooked collard greens, cooked diced potatoes, bread pudding, apple cobbler , raw beef, cooked stuffed fish.

Now, to the rodents. The inspector “Observed approximately 30 hard droppings in a corner next to a rat trap at cook line in the small kitchen, and approximately 20 hard in the back panel of oven at cook line in the large kitchen.”

We’re not done.

“Accumulation of black/green mold-like substance in the interior of the ice machine.” No hot water at a kitchen area employee handwash sink and no paper towels or mechanical hand drying device provided at the big kitchen’s handwash sink.

“Interior of oven has heavy accumulation of black substance/grease/food debris.”

The place was re-opened after a re-inspection the same day and stayed open after another inspection May 10.

▪ Domino’s Pizza, 133 SW 107th Ave., Sweetwater — Makes you feel a little uneasy when you see the chains on here, doesn’t it?

Only eight violations on May 4 and this was the only High Priority no-no: “Observed approximately 25 live roaches crawling on the wall next to the beverage rack near the dishwasher area, one by the oven in the kitchen area, and one live roach by the exterior door in the backside near the place where the single food containers are stored.”

Chain pizza was back in Sweetwater after the May 5 re-inspection

▪ Dunkin’ Donuts, 11790 SW 88th St., South Miami-Dade — The problem at this location wasn’t so much the April 23 inspection, although the eggs, sausage, cheese and chicken all were noted as being kept at temperatures warm enough to be potentially hazardous. This Dunkin’ escaped April 23 with a Warning Issued after the inspector saw a rusted ventilation hood in the food prep area and air blowing out of dusty ceiling vents in a back kitchen.

But when the inspector returned on April 24: “Both restrooms are out of service due to plumbing problems.”

That’ll get you shut down until you get your Roto-Rooter rocking.

Dunkin’ Donuts, 9515 Westview Dr., Coral Springs — This May 3 inspection could be a sequel. Not to the previous shutdowns and citations of Dunkin’ Donuts in South Florida, but to The Amityville Horror, a movie famous for flies.

The inspector found one fly each on two sugar doughnuts, one chocolate frosted with sprinkles, one glazed, and two flies on a chocolate frosted.

Next on the Stop Sale parade were 50 half gallon cartons of light cream; 18 one-gallon cartons of Borden milk and 13 one-gallon cartons of Borden Fat Free milk all of which were at improper temperatures. They’d been in the cooler for five days, which might have been less of a problem of the walk-in freezer door wasn’t kept open to help the temperature of other foods.

Also, “Precooked eggs in walk in cooler are under fan where condensation is leaking on top of paper covering eggs.”

Another thing that doesn’t make you feel good: “Handwash sink not accessible for employee use due to items stored in the sink.”

This sequel closed on May 3 and re-opened after the May 4 re-inspection.

▪ The Original Junie’s Restaurant, 18400 NW Second Ave., North Miami-Dade — The name seems to be an effort to distinguish this place from Junie’s Jamaican Restaurant on Northwest Seventh Avenue. And, after this inspection, we’re sure Junie’s Jamaican Restaurant appreciates The Original Junie’s effort.

On April 24, the inspector dropped a Stop Sale on the raw chicken and raw ox tail for being kept at too warm a temperature, then “bags of white rice has holes due to rodent chewed on bites on bags. Bags are in dry storage shelf area.”

Because the rodents got happy in The Original Junie’s, as the inspector noticed. There were over seven moist rodent droppings on top of the bags of rice, and over 35 moist pieces of rodent poop under the rice storage area. Also, “one moist rodent dropping in front of cases of oil in office area where food is stored; approximately 12+ moist rodent droppings in the office area, where food is stored… Approximately 25+ moist rodent dropping in back storage area by the three-compartment sink.”

Now, let’s talk about the roaches. The inspector saw more than six live and seven dead roaches on the top shelf “with clean plates and cups.” Four live ones and four dead ones “on a shelf with clean utensils.” More than 13 dead roaches and six live ones scurrying around the floor throughout kitchen area. There were over four live ones on the floor by the back door and two alive on the reach-in cooler by the kitchen entrance. More than four roaches were hanging out by the mop sink.

And, overhead, “approximately three dead insects in light shield in kitchen area.”

There was also “soil residue in food storage containers” in the reach-in cooler.

Things didn’t improve much for the April 24 re-inspection with seven live and more than 20 dead roaches in the kitchen. Original Junie’s reopened after the April 26 re-re-inspection.

▪ Priya’s Roti Shop, 8007 W. Sample Rd., Coral Springs — Not many violations, only eight and three High Priority on April 26, Priya’s was shuttered.

The roaches were noted: three dead ones in a cabinet in the front counter area, one live and one dead around the water heater, one by the handwash sink in the restroom, one live one by the kitchen beverage shelf, one live roach under a fire extinguisher on a cookline wall.

Priya’s was back open on April 27 re-inspection.

▪ Restaurante Las Colinas, 7130 Kimberly Blvd., North Lauderdale — The May 4 inspector found 16 live roaches scurrying about, including 10 under a single-door reach-in cooler in the kitchen area.

And, there seemed to be a hot water problem, as “hot water not provided/shut off at employee handwash sink and handwashing sink by the three-compartment sink.”

On the initial May 5 re-inspection, two live roaches were spotted and killed by the restauranteur. Las Colinas got re-opened on the second May 5 re-inspection.

▪ Rincon Progressno, 1169 NW 36th St., Miami — Roach eggs and rodent poop are worse than green eggs and ham, definitely not what you want to see on an inspection.

But on May 3, the inspector saw “two hard, dry roach eggs by the exterior door of the dry storage located behind the office.” Those are the eggs.

As for the poop, in the front area, the inspector saw six hard droppings on a chair by the cash register; eight hard droppings and three soft moist (translation: fresh) droppings under the coffee machine; nine hard droppings on the floor behind the shelf near the steam table; seven hard droppings on the scale counter next to the steam table; and four hard droppings behind the beer-only reach-in cooler.

In the kitchen, “also observed three hard droppings on the floor behind prep table, two soft and moist droppings in the same area and three hard droppings under three-compartment sink. Observed approximately 13 hard droppings on the floor behind the reach in cooler in dry storage located contiguous to the kitchen.”

Combine the observations “broken metal scoop stored inside ice machine” and “interior of ice machine is moldy” and well… If you need it further spelled out, the inspector “observed metal scoop with no handle used to dispense drinkable ice inside ice machine located in dry storage located behind the office.”

Also, why was the employee using the three-compartment sink to wash her hands? Maybe because the front area handwash sink was clogged and had standing water.

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